With the 2016 Election Polls Missing the Mark, Should Newsrooms Rely Less on Polls This Year?



I’m not sure newsrooms should be using polling information less in the future, but they should instead present the results as they actually are—mere estimates. Only after the polls were deemed to be obviously flawed—i.e. after President Trump took his surprising win in 2016—did we start hearing about why those polling results may have been flawed. However, we should have known all along those poll results could certainly misrepresent the truth of the public’s opinion.

Sam Burdette, 19, senior, University of Arizona, Tucson, Ariz.

Burdette is studying journalism and serves as editor-in-chief of the university’s student-run paper, The Daily Wildcat. She plans to pursue a master’s degree and hopes to work in breaking news after college. 

In my statistics classes following the election, the 2016 polls were a popular topic of discussion, especially because it was easy for senior high school stats students to pick out where things may have gone wrong.

Read the full article from Editor & Publisher: With the 2016 Election Polls Missing the Mark, Should Newsrooms Rely Less on Polls This Year?